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The City is seeking feedback for the 70th and Cahill small area plan, as a part of the larger 2018 Comprehensive Plan. In 2008, when the last Comprehensive Plan was completed, the area was identified as a place where change, such as significant remodeling, redevelopment or land use and zoning changes, is likely to occur.

When it comes to the future of the area, which of the following would you prefer and why:

Extensive remodeling – essentially keep the existing layout and buildings in place, but refresh the structures so that the area feels more updated.

Redevelop a large portion of what exists today – demolish a large portion of the area and basically start over with the site design to create better links to the surrounding neighborhoods, improve transportation options and increase the attractiveness of the 70th & Cahill area.

27 Responses

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Dennis Fernkes 4 months ago

Extensive remodeling – essentially keep the existing layout and buildings in place, but refresh the structures so that the area feels more updated. Or just leave it as it is. The restaurants are important to many of us.

3 Supports
 
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Philip Miller 4 months ago

I strongly favor "extensive remodeling". Having said that, I could imagine teardowns of certain building that aren't readily convertible like the old dry cleaners, some tired apt buildings.

I do not think a wholesale teardown makes sense. It's a sleepy residential neighborhood with some retail and light industrial. Making it something entirely different is wholly out of character.

1 Support
 
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Kaylin Eidsness admin 4 months ago

[From Robin J.] Edina has an opportunity to really spruce up an area that is badly showing its age. The houses, condos and apartments are dated and becoming less and less desirable for the upwardly mobile and the Edina empty-nesters. Southdale has become the apartment and retail mecca, Pentagon Park is slated for business & light industry. The 70th & Cahill area could be Edina's answer for the empty-nesters trapped in their big sprawling homes to downsize to condos with a variety of restaurants and small service businesses mixed in. I would envision a much smaller scale 50th & France (w/o retail) type look and feel with Grandview type Condominiums w/ underground parking, bus service & bike/walking paths. Thus, plan B - redevelop a large portion of what exists.

3 Supports
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Rachel Jerstad 4 months ago

And what about those of us who live right there. I love my town home on Village Drive and all of my neighbors and i will fight to stay in the home that i own.

0 Supports
 
 
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David Frenkel 4 months ago

How can the city force private land owners to tear down their properties? I hope there is no talk of eminent domain by the city of Edina. There is no mention of who owns the various parcels.

8 Supports
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David Tridgell 4 months ago

I agree. While I would like a total redevelopment, I don’t own property there and I don’t think a city should have the right to tear your business down just because it is “tired” looking. I’d like to know what the business owners think. Almost no one has mentioned that.

0 Supports
 
 
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Greg Konezny 4 months ago

I favor redevelopment but I think Edina has an opportunity to differentiate this area by keeping it lower key with a focus on serving the neighborhood. Focus on restaraunts, distinctive shops, and maybe some specialty retail. Avoid it being a large shopping destination or high rise condos that would create logistics problems.

12 Supports
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Laura Kondrick 4 months ago

My condo association consists of four three stories buildings tucked into a wooded and park like setting. I think to scale condos and townhouses would be in demand here.

0 Supports
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Rachel Jerstad 4 months ago

i own a town home right there and there is a condo building near by. There are a lot of town homes and condos in the area already.

0 Supports
 
 
 
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Sandra x 4 months ago

Ideally you should start all over. The area is divided by streets, parking lots, a big hill, etc. it is not safely walkable. I’m not sure this is feasible, but it would be nice to have an updated shopping/restaurant area to walk and bike to that feels safe and a part of SW Edina we could be proud of. We’re the last quadrant of Edina that has a 1950’s shopping center that has not been updated. It somehow needs to be rationalized in its design.

5 Supports
 
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Lynn Hechanova 4 months ago

The area needs total redevelopment. Poorly planned it appears to be tired old buildings. Every side makes you think you’re on the wrong side. Better use of space, more green space, way too much open parking lot. With the right mix of restaurants; retail and condos would be a great walkable place. The residential should be condos or townhouses, there have been way too many apartments approved recently. There are lots of seniors who would leave their single family homes if there were options in Edina for midpriced condos, but who are not interested in renting.

7 Supports
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Jessica Hinz 4 months ago

I agree, the area is of minimal use in it's current state. I would love nothing more than to have resources available within walking distance of my home and to feel proud of the Cahill area. This area looks and feels like the "wrong side of the tracks" in Edina.

4 Supports
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Rachel Jerstad 4 months ago

Instead of tossing out the current businesses and starting over, we should help them maintain their business and improve the look. Just like people, you should not judge the businesses by the look of the building but the quality of the product.

3 Supports
 
 
 
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Judith Felker 4 months ago

Lynn Hechanova speaks my mind. Thank you, Lynn!

1 Support
 
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Jonathan Scoll 4 months ago

I agree with the commenters who believe the area needs "remodeling." It appears tired, poorly planned -- or not really planned at all. That said, a way should be found to keep its neighborhood scale and feel, as a needed buffer between the adjoining residential and commercial areas. It could support more service-type uses, particularly for the aging population nearby, and in all events should be inviting to non-automobile traffic (bicycles, pedestrians), as others point out.

1 Support
 
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Laura Kondrick 4 months ago

I worry about the current business owners and disrupting their businesses during a large scale remodeling.

3 Supports
 
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Mary Wiley 4 months ago

There is little redeeming value to the existing buildings and (lack of) plan. A clean start would be great. I know others will disagree, but I'd like to see one or two fast food places with drive-thrus at the back of the buildings. People do not always have time to go to a sit-down restaurant.

0 Supports
 
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Rachel Jerstad 4 months ago

I agree with Laura Kondrick. And NO FAST FOOD. We have enough of those close near 77th and 100.
Remodeling would be great.

0 Supports
 
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Renata Faeth 4 months ago

We have lived in the area for 17 years, and often commented on the need for need for an update in this area.if I could choose .. I lean toward the complete re-development for reasons already mentioned above by others. But of course we need a better idea of costs, not just to taxpayers but to the business owners. If it’s too high, a remodel might be the best option.

0 Supports
 
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Meghan Figueroa 4 months ago

REMODEL. This doesn't mean that some of the businesses aren't still valuable to the area (I love Los Padres and Chang's Martial Arts!), but honestly Gramercy Tavern could open up at Cahill and I still wouldn't go because it's such a soul-sucking node of depression. Start over and do it right. Be ahead of the game. Don't be lazy and make it a Brueggers and a Walgreens. Keep valuable local businesses that you already have, and incentivize others to come by the fact that our neighborhood has plenty of people willing and able to be loyal patrons: we just need a reason. Consult with Andrew Zimmern (a local in the 'hood) and make it an area Edina is proud to have, rather than an embarrassing tangle of broken signs (I'm talking at you, Jeff Melin).

0 Supports
 
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Joel Stegner, Community volunteer 4 months ago

Bah humbug to black and white thinking - the remodel versus teardown is a false dichotomy. Keep what is working - get rid of what isn't. Build on strengths, build over weaknesses. Talking about shutting down viable businesses, tearing down and not replacing affordable housing, and taking moderately price homes to attract more top 1% households hurts those who have been loyal taxpaying Edina residents. It is always gong to be a stretch for young people and entrepreneurs without family wealth to move and stay here, so let's not make it any harder than it is already.

2 Supports
 
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MJ McG 4 months ago

We recently moved to this area to live in a townhome and the shopping center complex is an embarrassment to us. Somebody once said that it reminded them of a bankrupt city's remaining strip mall and I think that is a pretty accurate description. Even the old wood signs are just awful, it feels more like North Minneapolis than it does Edina. Shame on the Melin family for not updating this property and taking care of the grounds. I would love to see a complete re-development, a whole new look and new businesses (Caribou would be a dream!). I also agree that we do not need any more fast food. Anything would be an improvement over what's there now!

1 Support
 
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Richard Carlson 4 months ago

I favor redevelopment, not remodeling. Existing buildings are outmoded and a hodgepodge; pedestrian access doesn't work well.

0 Supports
 
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Will Durfee 4 months ago

While remodeling might be possible, the current layout and buildings will make it challenging to convert this area to what many seem to want (inviting and exciting mixed-use). To get this done right (and let's do it right), major redevelopment may be needed.

1 Support
 
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Meghan Van Someren 4 months ago

Extensive Remodeling. The new bike path makes this area especially accessible to local residents. More green space and more walking paths would be beneficial. There are a few restaurants that have really breathed new life into this area - Los Padres, Cahill Bistro, along with the long-standing TJs. I'd hate for their leases to be driven up, driving them out. I encourage mixed-use with a focus on restaurants and small independent retail that appeals to local residents (no chain stores, no Vitamin Shops, no fast food, no Walgreens) that allows the character of the neighborhood and residents to come through.

0 Supports
 
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Siobhan White 4 months ago

Some remodeling. No high-rises. No more traffic!

0 Supports
 
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Dixie Cain 4 months ago

I vote for, "Demolish a large portion of the area and basically start over..."

Make no little plans. They have no magic to stir men's blood. Make big plans: aim high in hope and work.--Daniel H. Burnham

0 Supports