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Discussion: Bike Sharing

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Bike sharing is an innovative transportation solution, ideal for short‐distance, point‐to‐point trips. These systems provide users the ability to pick up a bicycle for use within a service area. Some have specific pick up and drop off locations (docks) and some are "dockless," meaning they are picked up and dropped off randomly within the service area. These bicycles have GPS capabilities to monitor use and where they are located. A vendor agreement would ensure bicycles are located within the pre-determined areas.

Topic: Locations

What areas of the City could this service provide a benefit?

22 Responses

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Fran Fabrizio 9 months ago
  1. Areas of high-density housing and commercial activity. So, I could see this potentially having value around 50th and France and Southdale and the denser housing in those areas. Hwy 100/Vernon area has some useful destinations but is currently rather bike-unfriendly, unfortunately.

  2. Recreational areas. Nine Mile Creek. Braemar area? Pamela Park? Rosland Park? Bredesen? Centennial Lakes trail?

If it is integrated with Minneapolis and/or other neighboring suburbs, a lot more options suggest themselves, because then more people could use them for home work commutes.

5 Supports
 
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Charles Haff 9 months ago

Bike locations are the biggest reason why this program should not be used in Edina. Bike sharing works best in high density metros, which Edina is not. The location of the bikes would be too diffuse for many people to use. Or you would have to get in a car to go to a bike location...that doesn't make much sense?

4 Supports
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Joel Stegner, Community volunteer 9 months ago

I beg to differ. Get in your car and drive to the booming Southdale area. There is a lot of density of workers, shoppers and residents, with much more to come. A city like Edina serves all its residents. Those young singles and couples will have choose to buy housing in the single family neighborhoods if we make it a good day as soon as they start living and working here. There are many good alternatives to Edina the day we don’t offer what young couples and families want, and the coming generation is very clear about what they want.

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Stephen Beisang 9 months ago

This does not serve all Edina well because of the population density. What boundaries are the service area? 50 th and France have Minneapolis on one side of the street Edina on the other but might seem a spot. Southdale area maybe but beyond that it would not service Residents well.

2 Supports
 
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Sean Hayford Oleary 9 months ago

I think in terms of population and land use, Southdale and 50th & France areas make the most sense. However, there are some barriers the City needs to work to address. Both areas are difficult for bicycling today -- especially Southdale. Rolling out bike sharing is great, but it should come along with a comprehensive, fast-paced plan to improve bike access. However, even in the near term, the Edina Promenade and Nine Mile Creek Trail provide good bike options today.

Since both of these areas are near borders, I think Edina should also collaborate with neighboring cities -- especially Minneapolis and Richfield -- to make sure that people using bikes can at least cross over to businesses and destinations just over the border without going outside the bike share zone.

4 Supports
 
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Claudia Molina Munoz 9 months ago

I agree with other readers that the locations would be difficult to establish to be useful.

1 Support
 
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Todd Schroeder 9 months ago

50th and France, Southdale mall, Edinborough, Centennial Lakes....

1 Support
 
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Jennifer Hennemuth 9 months ago

I concur with the comments above that a bike service does not serve the area well. If anything, it would probably make the most sense to have them stationed near the trails such as Nine Mile Creek so that people can utilize them there. But I think most people intending to bike the trails will probably come with their own bike, so again, I think this is not a worthy endeavor.

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Barb Ryan 9 months ago

Southdale (with traffic calming, please), up and down both France and Xerxes (with traffic calming), to the pool!

1 Support
 
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Ted Allen 9 months ago
  1. Near high density
  2. Near parking. People could park and then use the bikes to move around an area rather than driving 2 blocks.
  3. At parks which have trails
1 Support
 
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Joel Stegner, Community volunteer 9 months ago

Our highest density areas, which are all already and will continue to add density. The city is obviously built to promote driving everywhere. I live within three blocks of Southdale hospital and most of my other medical services. There is no sidewalk that gets me there, busy roads that make biking more difficult and no place to safely park a bike and have it still there when I leave. Each of these things can and should be surmounted. If is difficult to achieve excellent in showplowing all our streets so people can get to work but we do in. The same is true for our excellent public services, schools and private institutions. Our people are smart and committed and can fix anything we set our mind to and tend not to take no for an answer. That is what creating a great place to live takes.

2 Supports
 
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Krisanthy Joy 8 months ago

50th and France, Southdale (near and around the office parks), near the high school, community center and Gus Young.

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Sarah Roddis 8 months ago

This does not make sense anywhere in Edina.

3 Supports
 
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Kerry Anderson 8 months ago

Makes absolutely no sense. Biking for 99+percent is a casual and very occasional activity for 5 months out of 12. Who will pay for the infrastructure required to segregate bicycles from cars to keep both groups safe. Again I sense a grant and grants are nothing more than relabeled tax dollars. Perhaps when bicycle registration fees cover the infrastructure costs then a reasonable discussion can be held.

2 Supports
 
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Dick Novack 8 months ago

While areas of Cahill, Parklawn and southern York may have residents who do not have or can afford bikes, nowhere else in the city is it needed or logical. Most city residences are so spread out people would have to travel a distance somehow to a bike location.

1 Support
 
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Lou Miranda 8 months ago

Combine the ideals from Vision Edina and Living Streets Plan with the “Nodes and Modes” ideas from the kickoff to the 2018 Comprehensive Plan and the just-approved 2018 Bike & Pedestrian Plan, and several, very specific places make a lot of sense in Edina.

Our neighborhood nodes, for which we are creating Small Area Plans over the past and next few months, are ideal locations: higher density (both residential & commercial), commercial destinations that are within biking distance of each other, and within walking distance of neighborhoods.

Sure, people in single family homes probably have a bike or three in the garage, but apartment, duplex, & condo homes often do not.

Edina’s densest areas & neighborhood nodes include Southdale area, 44th & France, 50th & France, Wooddale & Valley View, Grandview, and 70th & Cahill. Two areas with greater density but not officially neighborhood nodes include the many duplexes on France, just north of Hwy 62, and the existing and coming apartments in the Lincoln Drive area near Hwy 169.

Also, bikes at or near our schools makes a lot of sense, whether it’s getting home or to some extracurricular activities. The high school recently put in bike lanes & bike parking, so that makes it easier for students to bike.

If we think about recreational areas & trails, the first that come to mind are the wonderful Promenade and Nine Mile Creek Trail, which connects us to Richfield & Hopkins and lots of apartment dwellers. Also, Edina’s 3 largest, signature parks—Centennial Lakes (with many urban amenities), Fred Richards (very naturalistic), and Braemar (soon to be very dense with bike & ped trails, and containing/adjacent to sports amenities)—are ideal locations.

All of these nodes, whether commercial districts, schools, or parks/trails, are centers of activity. With Edina being only 4 miles wide by 4 miles tall, each of these nodes are within easy biking distance. And with denser cities lining our eastern and northern edges, nodes/destinations in Mpls, SLP, & Richfield are within easy biking distance.

Now all we need to do is execute on our new bike & pedestrian plan, to make it easier, safer, and more comfortable to bike between these nodes.

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Lou Miranda 8 months ago

And with Three Rivers Parks looking to create a trail segment to connect the Nine Mile Creek Trail to Hyland Lake Park Reserve, that opens another door to a magnificent destination, just outside our borders in Bloomington.

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angel luther 8 months ago

Along 9-mile Creek.

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Carol Rogers 8 months ago

Edina needs more designated bike lanes and trails for this to be worthy. There will be a lot more bike accidents. Edina is not ready for this.

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Hope Melton 8 months ago

Edina certainly is higher density, in the Southdale area, for example, or the northeastern quadrant. Density will only grow here. They should be available around schools, natural and park areas. Basically I'd want to pick one up and just go for a bike ride around the neighborhood!

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Michael Nowick 8 months ago

Of the locations I know in Edina, 50th and France for example, people walk there. As for Southdale, it's not safe to bicycle there. Traffic is heavy and fast. Drivers pay little attention to bikers or pedestrians. It's hard for me to make an economic case for adding bike sharing services in these areas.

0 Supports
 
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Mindy Ahler 8 months ago

Each of our nodes are great locations, but need to include safe bike routes within and to the node. Also near parks, trails (Nine Mile Creek), Promenade where people might arrive by other means but then can add biking to the recreation options available in the area. Minnehaha Park is an example of well-used rental pedal power where there are always visitors who then can go outside the park boundary on trails along the Mississippi River. Something similar might be available in Edina along the Nine Mile Creek Trail. In the greater Southdale area with better infrastructure that makes biking feel safer for all could be opportunities to move between residents and businesses and clinics without the need to drive.

0 Supports