This Discussion channel is currently closed.
V3_countryside-neighborhood-2

The Planning Commission and City Staff are looking for resident input to help ensure a balance among homeowners planning to move, existing neighbors impacted by new construction and new homeowners moving into our community. Here is your chance to provide feedback and propose solutions to redevelopment issues currently impacting the City.

Edina continues to be a disirable community. As a result, it has expereinced a large increase in the removal of existing homes and construction of new homes in established neighborhoods. This trend has sparked concern among residents. The Planning Commission established a subcommittee to identify residential zoning issues and suggest possible changes to our current zoning codes and policies.

Please keep all comments constructive and civil.

What are your top three suggestions regarding new residential constructions?

48 Responses

Default_avatar
Nancy Killilea over 1 year ago

My top three suggestions concerning new construction: 1) How can we consider and respect sight lines within the process? Bigger homes close to much smaller homes often result in a claustrophobic experience for the smaller home. Three story walls can feel overwhelming Ensuring appropriate sight lines would help. 2) Restrictions on adding fill or changing topography of the land would ensure that new homes don't dramatically change the feeling of the neighborhood or the views of the current residents. 3) Update the current set up requirements. One of the overall impacts of the building of much larger homes (regardless of lot size!) is the feeling of overcrowding and the elimination of open space.

One last thought given that Edina is trying to develop neighborhood identities (for example naming separate neighborhoods): Can we consider different solutions for different neighborhoods to ensure that we maintain the character of the neighborhood. I understand that we do that in neighborhoods such as Country Club. Perhaps other neighborhoods, such as Morningside, should have solutions appropriate to their needs.

0 Supports
Default_avatar
Josh Mason about 1 year ago

Nancy nailed it, esp. when it comes to neighborhoods like Morningside. It is getting ridiculous.

0 Supports
 
 
Default_avatar
David Frenkel over 1 year ago

City of Edina staff seem to be overwhelmed and unprepared for the volume of construction going on. I live next to a new house going up and I am surprised by the attitude of city hall that the streets surrounding the developmnet are part of the construction site. The streets surrounding the develpment are routinely blocked by construction related vehicles doing deliveries or dropping off/picking up construction vehicles like backhoes and bobcats. The site next to me looks like a junkyard with all the constructioon debris, old fencing and landscaping that is in piles around the property. The property was allowed to dig below the previous grade that borders my property where I have 2 huge oak trees that may be impacted by this digging. Is my responsbiltiy to inform the developer of state law that allows for triple damages if the developer kills these oak trees by their digging? I could go on about what I have seen but the bottom line is this new development looks like the wild west with limited controls. The city does not care if streets are blocked so school buses have to be rerouted at the last minute. I have seen and others have told me about school buses going backwards down streets because construction vehicles refused to move out of the way. I have talked to the city and state about this and nobody sees a problem. If construction takes priority over the safey of our children I see a big problem.

0 Supports
 
Default_avatar
David Frenkel over 1 year ago

@Nancy, I completely agree with you. You should be on the planning commission to add some common sense to the City of Edina's wait and see attitiude.

0 Supports
 
Bootstrap_toes
Kw x over 1 year ago

1) Enforce existing building codes. 2) Higher impact fees for construction permits which require heavy equipment on the streets. 3) Stick to the comprehensive plan and any variances subject to statuatory requirements.

0 Supports
 
Default_avatar
Andrew Brown over 1 year ago

How about a freeze on construction, so I can actually enjoy a summer of peace an quiet

0 Supports
Default_avatar
David Frenkel over 1 year ago

I do think it is crazy to allow construction on evenings, weekends and holidays. I have children who I do not want playing among construction equipment and materials. Why do these residential construction projects take priority over community livability? These developments are for profit businesses and why should the community be inconvenienced so somebody can make money?

0 Supports
 
Default_avatar
David Frenkel over 1 year ago

I think you are being facetious about the freeze but I do think there should be a freeze on new construction not on the books so the city can get its arms around what is going on with residential development. Things have spiraled out of control with what appears to be a lack of city staff which has led to a lack of various code and ordinance enforcement. There are unintended consequences like road blockages that have re-routed school buses and are a threat to emergency response. I moved from a community in VA that had very strict building codes and enforcement to Edina that is in comparison the wild west of construction.

0 Supports
 
 
Default_avatar
Isaac x over 1 year ago

More construction = higher property values = higher tax revenue. City Hall isn't overwhelmed, its the plan.

0 Supports
Default_avatar
David Frenkel over 1 year ago

Higher property values also means higher property taxes. If you are selling higher values are great if you plan on staying and paying higher property values or elderly on fixed income not so good. The city has to be careful there isn't a saturation of over priced homes and a real estate or economic bubble burst occurs leaving lots of these houses on the market. This scenario has happened on other communities. You mentioned a 'plan', hoping things continue on the upswing is not a plan. It will also be interesting to see how the quality of new construction holds up in 5/10 years down the road.

0 Supports
 
 
Default_avatar
Mark Daum over 1 year ago

I unfortunately live next to a teardown/new construction house being built on a 50 foot lot. Here are my concerns and suggestions:

The current side property setbacks are inadequate. The law allows new construction to tower over existing properties, robbing them of free space, sunlight, and landscaping/property repair access. We should not be forced to travel over the adjoining property to make home repairs.

1) Interior side yard setbacks need to be revised from the current 5 feet to a minimum of 10 feet for lots smaller than 60 feet, and revised accordingly for larger lots.

2) The setback for egress windows and roof overhangs need to be revised from the current 3 feet to 6 feet minimum. Come on people, 3 feet is equal to you stretching out your arms side to side!

3) Existing trees on adjoining properties should be better protected. All new construction excavation and subsequent building should be subject to inspection and direction of the Edina City Arborist at the expense of the builder. One fifth of my mature river birch tree's roots were destroyed by the excavation of the new house. Additionally, the trimming that was required due to the new construction was done hap-hazardly by a construction worker, leaving the branches exposed to disease! They have a right to trim the trees that overhang the adjoining property, not kill them.

4) Builders should be required to pay $10,000 for each new house built for street repairs of the street the new construction occupies. The amount of damage done to the streets due to heavy construction equipment and their cost of repair should not be forced upon the existing residents of that street.

5) Any and all builders who have violated any of the rules for new construction should be be banned from working again within the city limits. First offense= 3 years. Second offense = 5 years. Third offense = 10 years. This would go a long way to ensuring the companies who built new construction in Edina follow the rules.

1 Support
Default_avatar
David Frenkel over 1 year ago

Did you know there is a state law that allows for triple damages if a neighboring property owner kills trees on your property? I agree with your suggestions but the city appears to be addicted to the cash via building permits this new development is bringing into the city treasury and seems reluctant to upset the developers.

0 Supports
Default_avatar
Mark Daum over 1 year ago

I will be looking up that state law today. I have photos from both the excavation and trimming fiascos that show the damage.

Extremely frustrating how the city seems more interested in assisting developers than 25 year residents/tax payers!

0 Supports
 
Default_avatar
Matt Tourangeau about 1 year ago

David, while you contct that attorney regarding Marks tree roots, ask him about over hanging branches that are encroachments onto someone elses property, also ask him about damages, your tree roots are on my property which means you planted your tree to close to my property, i your tree roots damage my sewer line or lawn ( maple trees have shallow roots) what would my recourse be. I say this so you and Mark can get serious, stop whining.

0 Supports
 
 
Default_avatar
David Frenkel over 1 year ago

I have talked to a lawyer about the tree issue and yes I would take photos. I doubt the city or the developers know about the law and of course developers hide behind I didn't know rational. The city is typical of code enforcement where they go after an easy mark and don't get into big battles with developers who may take them to court which has happened. The city needs a code of conduct which if not followed developers are suspended or banned from doing business in Edina. If state and federal government does it why can't Edina have a reasonable code of conduct.

0 Supports
 
Default_avatar
David Frenkel about 1 year ago

Matt, thanks again for drawing attention to my century old trees. Again, FYI, I did not plant the trees and before construction started next to my house the 2 yards were at the same grade. I did not ask the developer to go below grade. The new property owner has the legal right to trim the tree branches over there property. I understand the law on this issue. It is impossible for my trees to block my neighbors utilities since they are on the other side of the lot from my trees. If whining is requiring the city to enforce local, state and federal laws around construction you can call it anything you want. If you like 3rd parties trampling your rights as a property owner I applaud your flexibility.

0 Supports
 
 
Bootstrap_tom_in_front_of_door
Tom Laforce over 1 year ago

Here are two suggestion for the builders. It might create some good will which they seem to be lacking in these days. Put up a sign 3 weeks prior to the wrecking ball inviting people to have it on perennials. One is about to go near me and the yard is full of nice plants that could have been given a new home. It was empty early this fall, the perfect time for transplanting. Now they'll just be destroyed along with the home.

Also, there should be a requirement that a salvage company be brought in before any house is torn down. I've got to think it would make economic sense for someone to spend a couple days stripping out metal, fixtures, working appliances, etc. Maybe this happens, but I haven't noticed it yet. It's hard to watch livable houses be smashed to nothing and taken to the landfill. What a waste.

0 Supports
Default_avatar
David Frenkel over 1 year ago

Edina is in the dark ages when it comes to commercial recycling. There is no mandatory commercial recycling. Drive by almost any construction dumpster and it is full or recyclable cardboard. There are companies that tear out wooden floors for resale. Developers are in the business of getting up new houses ASAP and not bothering with anything else.

0 Supports
Default_avatar
Matt Tourangeau about 1 year ago

David, you are not in the business, you have to way the cost of salvage against possible gain. it costs about 8 bucks a square foot to lay raw wood flooring. If the floor has been sanded 2 -3 times, its projected life has been used up.

0 Supports
 
 
Default_avatar
Matt Tourangeau about 1 year ago

regarding paragragh #1 Tom! are you serious? You want a builder to wait 3 weeks for a bunch of other people to fight over plants, just how would they be distributed. Maybe YOU or anyone else should approach the owner prior to selling and PURCHASE any and all lanscaping you want. But being a liberal, you want to legislate it and make a rule.

2, all properties are stripped of hazardous materials including light bulbs, transformers, appliances, etc, etc,etc.

& yes, if there are architectural things in the house anyone is going to salvage those because they are worth lots of $$$

Yes I attacked you Tom, I am sorry, but its rediculous ideas like this that waste peoples time.

0 Supports
Bootstrap_tom_in_front_of_door
Tom Laforce about 1 year ago

Hey Matt, they asked for suggestions. I provided some.

0 Supports
 
 
Default_avatar
David Frenkel about 1 year ago

Matt, I have young children that I try not to frame everything in dollars and cents. Why can't Edina try to be a leader in at least attempting to recycle some residental construction materials. Yes some floors may not be salvagable but some may be reusable. Edina has promoted some of its green achivements why doesn't the city do more? Is it that difficult to require recycling commercial cardboard? I see dumpsters full of cardboard going to the dump instead of being recycled. There are plenty of states that require commercial cardboard recycling but not MN or Edina.

0 Supports
 
 
Default_avatar
David Frenkel about 1 year ago

Are there any meeting notes from the meeting or anybody that attended have any comments? Thanks

0 Supports
 
Default_avatar
David Frenkel about 1 year ago

Today I witnessed 2 cement trucks parked side by side blocking Golf Terrace and then 2 big utility trucks drove over a curb on to a neighbors lawn to get around the trucks. Is this construction boom completely out of control? Is driving on neighbors lawns acceptable under 'developers rights' I keep in hearing from city officials? What can I do to keep trucks off my property since the construction industry does not care. I have a neighbor across the street that has tracks in the snow from a heavy truck driving on her property.

0 Supports
 
Default_avatar
J Lonnquist about 1 year ago

Thanks for this online opportunity for input for those who can't attend the meetings on this important topic. Having lived next to a home redevelopment by a commercial interest, I offer these suggestions: 1) In addition to immediate neighbor notification and opportunities to view the plans, require developers and city inspectors to publish a time during which neighbors can walk the site and view where new walls will be located on the property. This should be done before machinery arrives, as it is then too late or too expensive to correct or contest set-backs. 2) City expenses that are caused by developer activity (e.g. officers addressing traffic or noise concerns that neighbors can't settle through requests to the builders or contractors) should be billled back to the developer. That is only fair: if developers are making a profit while working in a residential area, the city shouldn't have to bear additional expenses and residents have the right to retain a livable environment. 3) Keep in mind that living next to major construction rattles even sensible people. It is inconvenient and even stressful. Seeing contractors trampling your gardens or severing your gas lines makes it harder to be patient with the inevitable parking and noise issues. And the signs that contractors post about being respectful to neighbors are pure p.r. in my opinion and don't alter the behaviors of their contractors. If it is a homeowner/dweller/neighbor undergoing a renovation, patience lasts much longer. If it is a developer building a spec house, there is a different dynamic. Should they be required to have a buyer who will live in the home in place before proceeding with construction? I think that would go a long way to softening some of the neighbor concerns.

Thanks for considering these ideas. We know the demand for infill housing will always be strong in Edina given the location and schools, so please do what is correct for the city and its residents -- the builders won't walk away if we make their parameters a little tighter.

0 Supports
 
Default_avatar
David Frenkel about 1 year ago

@Jack, it would be interesting to hear feedback from the homeowners of houses previously built by each developer. I am seeing things on the new house next to me that are problematic. For example the developer went below the previous grade in the back yard which is now below my yard and adjacent street. We already have a high water table and a yard filling with water will cause problems. The new grade in the back yard may also cut into the roots of 2 mature oak trees I have along the common border which is problematic. Edina likes to talk about all the environmental initiatives yet allows cutting down of mature trees. Lots of issues that need to be addressed.

0 Supports
Default_avatar
Matt Tourangeau about 1 year ago

David, it appears you have an issue with the builder who built the house next to you, I am very sorry, I asked this question myself on P.I.E, & Jack is asking it here. Now that a new owner lives in that home, how do you treat them, are they welcomed? did you build a big fence to separate your self from them, what exactly is your relationship with them and others who have had BIG BAD HOUSES built in you hood?

0 Supports
Default_avatar
David Frenkel about 1 year ago

Matt, none of my comments have actually been addressed to the acutal house being built but that seems to be your hot button. My issue is with how the neighborhood has been treated by the developer and there contractors. These job sites are poorly supervised and the contractors push the limits on how they use the road. You are making all kinds of assumptions, if you are not familiar with the property I am referring to it is ok to ask questions. The new owners have not move in and FYI they are due to move in sometime in April. Why are you so worried about my relationship with my neighbors, that has nothing to do with this blog. When my new neighbors move in I might be too busy having 2 very large oak trees removed form my property. Thanks for your interest in my relationships.

0 Supports
 
Default_avatar
David Frenkel about 1 year ago

Matt, none of my comments have actually been addressed to the acutal house being built but that seems to be your hot button. My issue is with how the neighborhood has been treated by the developer and there contractors. These job sites are poorly supervised and the contractors push the limits on how they use the road. You are making all kinds of assumptions, if you are not familiar with the property I am referring to it is ok to ask questions. The new owners have not move in and FYI they are due to move in sometime in April. Why are you so worried about my relationship with my neighbors, that has nothing to do with this blog. When my new neighbors move in I might be too busy having 2 very large oak trees removed form my property. Thanks for your interest in my relationships.

0 Supports
 
 
 
Default_avatar
Mark Daum about 1 year ago

Another post about the meeting last Saturday morning:

Side set-backs were universally deemed inadequate. My suggestion of doubling the setbacks from 5 foot to 10 feet for 50 foot lots was questioned whether the remaining space would be large enough for new construction. One of the attendees from the Morningside area suggested perhaps if a 50 foot lot isn't large enough for a person's dream home, they should search for a larger lot.

While it's true that Edina has many 50 ft lots, I agree that this size lot is being abused by those who will build right to the lot lines if allowed. The question should be what is an appropriate size house for the size of the lot.

Building massive, rules-testing sized homes in a neighborhood of smaller lots will result in damaging the value of the existing homes. I fear that not too far in the future, my once desirable arts & crafts home will be worth only the value of the land, and ultimately bulldozed for a new mini McMansion. Might have to look into historical designation.

0 Supports
Default_avatar
David Frenkel about 1 year ago

These larger new homes also can create a fire hazard for neighbors being built so close to the property line. Most of these new homes have 2 story front atrium's which become a funnel for fire which is why many of these new homes when they catch fire are a total loss. The construction trades have successfully lobbied to keep state building codes from requiring residential sprinkler systems which fire marshals are in favor of having in the code. Another example of common sense being thrown out the window because of lobbying. @Mark, your comments are repeated by developers who tell residents they are going to buy their houses and tear them down. I passed on buying a new house in a neighborhood with older houses for reasons many people have mentioned.

0 Supports
 
 
Default_avatar
Nan Schwappach about 1 year ago

I agree with most of what has been written and suggested...but would like to add that there should be restrictions on the construction process that take into consideration the neighbors in the immediate area. There is a tear down, new build, three houses down from me. The demolition, blasting, noise has virtually shook my house and rattled my windows. There are new cracks in the wall and ceiling plaster. I have witnessed dumpsters dragging on the street and leaving behind damaged roads...and this is just the beginning! There should be rules that construction companies must follow and an avenue that neighbors can follow to petition enforcement.

0 Supports
Default_avatar
David Frenkel about 1 year ago

The key as you eluded to is enforcement. I think the city is understaffed for the flood of new houses being built. It is too bad Edina housing inspections does not have the reputation of writing citations like the Edina Police has. There has been a constructioon dumpster partially on a sidewalk on Wooddale in the Sunset neighborhood and nobody seems to care.

0 Supports
 
 
Default_avatar
Lois Meerwald about 1 year ago

I live next door to a teardown/new construction and agree with many of the comments. I understand the need to refresh the housing stock but with what. In my neighborhood of $300,000 homes, they are being replaced with $800,000 homes. Good for the city tax base but will it last? If you want an $800,000 home there are plenty in other Edina neighborhoods. I think the city would be better with a mix of housing prices instead of th way it is headed.

0 Supports
 
Default_avatar
Lois Meerwald about 1 year ago

I live next door to a teardown/new construction and agree with many of the comments. I understand the need to refresh the housing stock but with what. In my neighborhood of $300,000 homes, they are being replaced with $800,000 homes. Good for the city tax base but will it last. If you want an $800,000 home there are plenty in other Edina neighborhoods. I think the city would be better with a mix of housing prices instead of the way it is headed.

0 Supports
Default_avatar
David Frenkel about 1 year ago

The city is working under the premiss that it will work it self out for the best. I moved from one of the first planned communities in the US which is about the size of Edina. The planning shows.

0 Supports
 
 
Default_avatar
Angie Berger about 1 year ago

The premise has not been yet proven that there needs to be any changes. Offering suggestions buys into the idea that there is a problem to be solved. 1) Do not do anything that restricts the property rights of Edina taxpayers 2) Enforce current restrictions 3) Increase monitoring and fines on contractors that are causing some of the problems.

1 Support
Default_avatar
David Frenkel about 1 year ago

I have the City numerous times to do what you suggested with little luck.

0 Supports
 
 
Default_avatar
Matt Tourangeau about 1 year ago

Most of all these comments are a bunch of people whining.

Yes, the city should police construction sites and neighbors who are adversely affected should make their voices heard at the city, so that the city can address those issues with the builder and or subs that are at fault.

People here should hold their comments to the project next door to them and or in their immediate neighborhood.

Prior to posting your comment, if it’s not a fix or a solution (meaning within the law and the ability of the city to perform & not a restriction of the rights of the property owner) just don't post it. Oh yeah, think to yourself, am I whining before you post it. Construction is dirty, time is money, and the sooner their done with the project the quieter it will be. No you don’t need to put up with destruction to your property, call the city!

SETBACKS, remember what you ask for, whatever you want the builder to do will apply to YOU, think about remodeling, etc. Someone made the remark setbacks should be 10 feet on either side of a new home, absolutely laughable, every home in Edina built prior to 1950 has a 5 foot setback on either side, what makes one think it’s acceptable to change that? You could always hang out your windows and shake hands or watch your neighbor do whatever in their homes. And Im pretty sure you don’t want a 30 foot wide house next to you.

AFFORDBLE HOUSING, Really! That’s an argument here? Seriously? People and builders are buying homes from $400,000 to a $1,000,000, and tearing them down to build new. I will also add to that, these new owners all have 3 - 4 kids or more so I really don’t want to hear about families not being able to afford home here when it’s quite evident THEY CAN. Also keep in mind, these new homes are increasing the value of your property, and if you disagree, show me an example, I will eat my words. You find me one person that will tell me that $400,000 is affordable, I’m pretty sure you know the income it takes to buy that house.

DRAINAGE, this is probably the only thing I can see that a neighbor has a complaint; no one should have to have water coming onto their property from another’s. Especially if they raised or were allowed to raise the lot.
MAKING ABSURD RULES for builders. Stop! Just Stop! This comes from a suggested requirement that plants should be allowed to be salvaged, etc by the neighbors.
I’ll revert to my second statement as to the city policing a construction project and fining them appropriately. It’s your job to make the complaint; it’s the cities job to enforce the rules.

And finally, they are called uniform building codes for a reason, if you want to do something outside of them; you get a variance, which needs to be approved. Also keep in mind current building practices using new materials which cause a home to be taller, etc. Floor trusses, roof trusses, higher basement and interior ceilings, allow for larger, open interior rooms, these are what because a home to become those towering so called mansions.

Oh and remember, families are buying these homes and I hope you are keeping with Edina’s standards and graciously welcoming them when they move in, they are your new neighbors and are excited to be there.

0 Supports
Default_avatar
David Frenkel about 1 year ago

Matt, you hit the nail on the head, I have been complaining to the city and I get a lot of answers like the developers have rights and mainly no response. Over the past 5 months of construction next to me I have probably called the police close to 20 times for blockiing roads, parking illegally, parking before roads are plowed, dumping constructon materails on the street and more. You comments are interesting but not very useful. I have been experiencing first hand not only violations of the cities various street ordinances but violations of federal OSHA laws regarding worker safety. The city is overwhelmed which is why they have announced they are hiring somebody to watch redidental construction. Why has it taken so long for the city to spend some of the millions in construction permit money to acutally hire somebody to monitor construction sites? Thanks for your comments Matt but I hope you don't have to deal with this construction wild west in your neighborhood.

0 Supports
 
 
Default_avatar
Mark Daum about 1 year ago

Matt, You seem to be under the impression that City requested suggestions & solutions to upgrading existing residential building codes is whining. Reading you posts suggest you are either a builder or a new monster homeowner who couldn't care less about your neighborhood. Nice to have you in the discussion, but your comments do not assist in finding solutions to the real problems.

0 Supports
Default_avatar
Joseph x about 1 year ago

I replied about Matt's comment. See above. Realtors, builders may be investing in the neighborhood by helping "distressed" properties but not for the long term as their checks will eventually be cashed.

1 Support
 
 
Default_avatar
Joseph x about 1 year ago

Mark as a neighbor in the area you are talking about I agree. I agree but think the responses of "whining" sounds more like a realtor making them as we sit with three listings on our block with another listing for 999,999 new construction now bank-owned. I shudder when I see a REMAX sign put up because I fear the new construction will already become a pre-forclosure candidate on some of these spec homes.

0 Supports
Default_avatar
David Frenkel about 1 year ago

The bank owned new house you mentioned reinforces what I have mentioned at the past that Edina has to be careful that this new housing bubble doesn't collapse and leave even more houses in foreclosure. These are expensive houses going up in a speculative market for a very small buyer demographic. What neighborhood is the foreclosed house in? Is there any particular reason you think the house has not sold (over priced, location, poor layout)?

0 Supports
Default_avatar
Joseph x about 1 year ago

On the Creek off 57th st with 55410 zip code. Maybe priced out of neighborhood or because it is on a busier street or too close to France Ave itself. Not sure.

0 Supports
 
 
 
Default_avatar
Jacqueline Zipp about 1 year ago

I don't think most Edina residents oppose improvements and even as we object to huge new houses on 50-foot lots, we welcome our new neighbors. What concerns me first, like others, is re-development that is both out of character (style-wise) for the existing neighborhood and too large for the lot size. I know many of us have lost privacy in our backyards and rooms in our homes. Zoning laws need to be changed to address this. Second, with $1,000,000+ homes replacing $300,000-$500,000 homes I think we are legitimately concerned that the value of our 1950s homes will gradually be reduced to that of the land. Third, I am very concerned about the increased water runoff towards existing homes caused by changed amounts of hard surfaces and elevated foundations; I was informed by the city that builders are allowed to increase the foundation height 1 foot above where it previously was. On lots with 5-foot setbacks, this results in real runoff issues. While the city was responsive to my calls during reconstruction next door and required the builder to make changes to the swale so that it complied with the engineering design, I am nervous for the spring melt and rains. Finally, I agree with others who call for much higher impact fees from builders for damages to roads, especially. We haven't even begun to pay the assessments for our reconstructed streets before we watch the daily parade of heavy construction equipment wear them down.

0 Supports
Default_avatar
David Frenkel about 1 year ago

Also if you look at the street site lines the lots somewhat conform to each other and you can see down the properties. Many of these new houses have different setbacks, they have retaining walls front and back and the topography of the lot is completely changed not to mention the removal of mature trees.

0 Supports
 
 
Bootstrap_100cityseal__green_
City Of Edina admin about 1 year ago

To keep this space welcoming to everyone and their ideas, please keep comments respectful, constructive and on-topic. Thanks!

0 Supports