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Discussion: Street Parking

The Engineering, Police and Public Works department are looking for feedback on the City’s street parking ordinance, as it’s been many years since it’s been revaluated. Per Chapter 26 of the City Code, no person shall park a vehicle for more than six consecutive hours on a street unless in areas designated by signs or if such persons are actively engaged in performing services. It also states from Nov. 1 to March 31, no person shall park on any street from 1 a.m. to 6 a.m.

Students and participants in Parks & Recreation events sometimes use all the available parking spots in an area, so residents are unable to use them. Should there be specific parking restrictions around schools and parks? (i.e., No Parking 8 a.m. – 4 p.m. Monday – Friday.) Keep in mind, residents would also not be able to park on the streets in the specified areas during those dates and times either.

19 Responses

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Paul Juhl 7 months ago

I feel there ought to be few restrictions for parking but if there are certain areas where it's a consistent problem, there should be a mechanism for residents to be able to park in front of their homes. Perhaps a limit on the # of hours parked during certain time periods or being able to get a permit. Regarding the high school, I have no idea of the school's policy on student parking or the capacity in the lot. When I went to high school decades ago, at old Edina in fact, some kids needed a car to get to an after school job but many just didn't want to ride the bus. If there is a consistent overflow of student parking onto streets these days I can understand residents and their guests being frustrated.

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Kaylin Eidsness admin 7 months ago

[Comment from Joel Stegner] I was involved at starting the Yorktown Community Garden. There was literally no city parking for that park - none on York and no on the adjacent street in Richfield. The limited parking at the Southdale Y was being used.

The Y was a good neighbor and didn’t challenge this, but when I suggested the city provide parking, Y helped with $50,000 and 30+ spots were added to be used jointly, a win-win solution.

Parks need city parking. People object to paving green space, but since the lot was built park and Y use has increased. Some street parking should always be available for park use. Residents can use their garages and driveways, but their visitors also need places.

As Edina has way too many busy streets with no sideways, you need solutions so young children and older adults with walkers aren’t In the street, forced to walk rather than more safely drive.

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Ryn Melberg 6 months ago

I'm on Pamela Park and appreciate the cooperation from the police when there are all-day events; they allow extended parking on the street since there is not enough parking for these events in the lots.

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Beth Psihos 6 months ago

If you buy a house by a park or a school, you should expect that people who use the park or the school will park there. To restrict or eliminate parking around these areas because someone might have a visitor at some point is crazy.

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Da x 6 months ago

No, there should not be restrictions unless parking on both sides of the street causes traffic flow issues. In that case, restrictions on certain sides should be allowed

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Rick Treece 6 months ago

To me parks and schools are not equivalent re: parking. Schools have all-day, regular users and should provide adequate parking for them. Parks have sporadic short-term users. But the same solution can work in both cases. Put up signs that limit street parking to 3 hours in those areas 8 a.m. - 8 p.m., say. Maybe 4 hours around parks – do baseball games last over 3 hours or does it just feel that way?

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Roger Scharton 6 months ago

Students should not use city streets for parking in lieu of on campus parking. Way to many potential problems. Residents should have the right to post parking restrictions adjacent to their as needed.

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Melissa Schmidt 6 months ago

Public streets are public. Residents should not be given priority use of street parking over someone there to attend an event at a nearby park. Traffic flow is a different issue. If a street is too narrow for a parked car on either side and a moving vehicle can't get through then there shouldn't be parking on one side of the street.

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Michelle Collette 6 months ago

I live on a cul de sac street next to the high school. Despite no parking signs, thus block is still an active drop off/pick up spot. I understand why the signs were put up before we lived here as the circle can become a parking lot. That said, it would be helpful to have a mechanism for residents to have house maintenance work done without either vendor or resident being ticketed when both the driveway and one street spot are needed. I moved here from a NYC suburb where street parking was also restricted. The town issued "Resident" passes where during the specified hours, one car registered associated with that address could park directly in front.

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Rick Hendrickson 6 months ago

As for scheduled sporting activities in Parks; what ever happened to team members carpooling or cycling to their games? As for school parking; the only students of age would be in high-school. As there is only one and the existing on premise parking egress is congested at best given staff for both Valley View and the High School the solution might be to charge even more for permits. If the residents surrounding the school believe parking and increased traffic is a menace they should request permit only parking restictions such as those surround the private colleges in Mpls and St. Paul. At least in the past St. Patricks either opened their lot for free or permits. Do they still do this and is the church on Antrum open to the possibility. In the past they have posted No Parking signs with the threat of towing. Perhaps a teachable moment for students to grow beyond the feeling of entitlement to understanding and feeling the positive emotions of empathy can bring.

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Tom Koon 6 months ago

How about finding alternatives that encourage students to walk to school or take a bus? Beyond that, no restrictions regarding parking on the street. .

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Jennifer Hennemuth 6 months ago

Residents should never be restricted from parking in front of their own homes. And streets need to be wide enough to allow street parking and adequate passing traffic lanes. The policy of narrowing streets just creates more conflict, congestion and safety concerns when there is not adequate street space to accommodate the traffic, parking, pedestrians and bicyclists.

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Trent Luger 6 months ago

Schools and Parks aren't the only areas that need to be addressed. Neighborhood streets adjacent to business districts with insufficient employee parking should be included in the discussion.

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Janet Conn 6 months ago

If there are areas where the intention is to prevent all-day parking by students, employees, etc., I suggest that residents be given two or three tags they could use for guests, repairmen, etc. that exempt them from the parking prohibition. I. e., let residents and their visitors park on the street during the otherwise 'no parking' hours.

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Chris Hubert 6 months ago

Neighborhoods around schools and businesses should have the option to restrict parking if parking and the associated traffic causes problems (e.g., safety concerns). I suggest permitted parking to allow those residents to still utilize street parking.

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Isaac Broberg 6 months ago

Its ridiculous that Edina is being passive aggressive to avoid the concept of resident only parking signs.

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Judith Felker 6 months ago

Isaac, I know I'm a little slow, but I don't understand the meaning of your sentence. It would help if you could explain its intent more clearly. Thank you

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Sarah Franssen 6 months ago

With all of the changes to Pamela Park combined with the ridiculous number of construction vehicles, it is really hard for residents to get around, much less park their cars. I've been literally blocked into my driveway at times when I need to get to work. I've seen buses have to reroute on the fly because they can't make it down the streets. This is my kids' reality. I can't let them ride their bikes much of the time because it is a safety hazard. Does anyone care about the people who live here?

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Judith Felker 6 months ago
  1. I agree with the majority of posts here, that the six hour parking rule should be eliminated.
  2. School personnel should poll students who drive about their reasons for driving, and create a remedy. If, for example, kids remain on school grounds for after-school activities, there should be a (certain time) bus when it's needed, and (another certain time) for "last bus leaving". Students should be well informed that taking the bus is better for the environment, more respectful of residents living near the schools, and safer because of congestion on streets during school starting hours. LISTEN to the H.S. drivers to ascertain their NEED to drive, and then meet their needs by changing the bus service system.
  3. The city should immediately create more "park and ride" lots to encourage commuting by bus, This may require builders to provide space for these lots in their building plans. No one enjoys sitting in traffic, concerned about getting to work on time. MEET THE NEED!
  4. The city should create more bus routes to and from main business areas to reduce the need for parking on residential streets.
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