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Discussion: Water Conservation

Water sources vary from ground and surface water, and can be supplied by the City or from private wells for drinking, cleaning, sanitation, irrigation and more. In the Twin Cities metro area, approximately 20 percent of all treated drinking water is used outdoors, with a majority of this being used on lawns and landscapes. According to a University of Minnesota Extension and Metropolitan Council study, water use in the summer months is nearly three times greater than water use in the winter.

The City has an odd-even sprinkling ordinance to conserve water. Homes with even-numbered addresses may water their lawns before 11 a.m. or after 5 p.m. on even-numbered dates of the week. Homes with odd-numbered addresses may water before 11 a.m. or after 5 p.m. on odd-numbered dates.

How can the City encourage water conservation?

12 Responses

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Sharon G 6 months ago

By being a role model. There are so many grassy areas that the city mows. I know they don't water it, so it doesn't really pertain to water consumption directly, but the constant carpet of grass in public areas contributes to the concept of big lawns, which do consume water. The city should begin a "Ground Cover Initiative" that installs attractive, low-maintenance, low water-use ground covers instead of seeding/sodding in public areas.

4 Supports
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Judith Felker 5 months ago

Cudos to you, Sharon! I second your motion!

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Michael Bowers 6 months ago

My water bill is often at or below the usage level that requires a minimum payment. Financially there is no incentive for me to reduce my water usage any further.

1 Support
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Judith Felker 5 months ago

Good for you, Michael! You obviously use a minimal amount of water, and I, for one, would be interested in knowing how you manage your use!

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Susan Tucker 6 months ago

Encourage the use of low water-use shower heads. As technology improves on compostable toilets, incorporate use in building codes.

2 Supports
 
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Judith Felker 5 months ago

Fracking for natural gas takes a lot of water which is forever contaminated. I suggest our city states publicly that we won't allow fracking and will pressure our state and our country to outlaw this destructive mining practice. Raise the cost of water. I know this is unpopular, but it seems to me that people should pay whatever it costs to clean up rivers, lakes, and oceans. Paying the true cost of clean water would incentivize all of us to value clean water for its true worth.

2 Supports
 
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Kate Quale 5 months ago

The City of Edina could offer grants or rebates like it's neighbors St.Louis Park & Minneapolis do to create raingardens, prairie restoration & other low water usage landscaping.

1 Support
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Louann Waddick 5 months ago

The watersheds offer grants

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amy frerker 5 months ago

Love Katie's idea. Rain gardens are much more beautiful than a big expanse of grass. Let's follow the leadership being exhibited in Mpls and SLP. Our residents are ready!

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Neil Johnson 5 months ago

Has anyone tried longrooted grass such as Pearl's grass seed? Longrooted grass is 12"-14" deep compared to regular grass which is 3-4" deep. This makes it more drought tolerant and grows slower (need to only mow once a month!). I have used it and appears to be very resistant to drought, traffic and dog urine. We are going to not use our sprinkler system at all this year and see what survives of our old grass and if it dies convert fully over to Pearl's grass seed. I think the city of Edina should inform citizens about all the different kinds of longrooted grass because many of us still desire lawns.

1 Support
 
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Louann Waddick 5 months ago

Is there a way to enforce the watering of odd and even days? Is there a fine or any consequence?

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Jennifer Collins 5 months ago

I too wonder about residents overwatering with their automatic sprinkler systems. I often see my neighbors' sprinkler systems running during or just after we've gotten lots of rain. My immediate neighbors water so heavily that I have bog-like conditions in one area of my property and water is constantly draining out of their yard into the street. Their water bill must be huge in the summer. Can you identify properties with excessive water usage in summer months and send notices encouraging them to decrease water use? Make it financially punitive when water usage exceeds certain thresholds? Require mandatory installation of rain sensors with irrigation systems? It just seems so wasteful. For the record, I have an irrigation system with a rain sensor but I frequently just turn the system off when we have adequate rainfall. I hardly used it last summer and haven't used it yet this year and my garden looks beautiful!

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